Annotated Bibliography

Annotated Bibliography

Sources for Kumeyaay Expansion of Knowledge

The following bibliography is annotated wherever possible to provide the reader with a summary of the book or article.  In addition, if known, the institution or library that holds the work or has copies of the work is also provided.  Many articles and books are available on line and the web site or source of such electronic versions is also provided.

Almstedt, Ruth. Bibliography of the Diegueño Indians. Ramona, Calif: Ballena Press, 1974. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. Almstedt, Ruth. Diegueño Curing Practices. San Diego, Calif: San Diego Museum of Man, 1977. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

 

Almstedt, Ruth. Diegueno Deer Toe Rattles. San Diego, Calif: San Diego Museum of Man, 1968. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Riverside, Autry National Center, University of California, Los Angeles.

 

Almstedt, Ruth. Multiple World View in a Diegueño Community. Thesis (M.A.) San Diego State College, 1970. San Diego State University Library, Autry National Center.

 

Alter, Ruth, and Sandra Shaw. The Painted Rocks. [San Diego, CA.]: [Authority], 1995. [Juvenile Audience] San Diego State University Library, San Diego Public Library, San Jose State University, Berkeley Public Library, Sonoma County Library.

 

American Indians. Volume 1. Volume 1. United States: Various, 1900. State Library of NSW Dixson Library. Contents: American museum of natural history (vol. xv, part I) : pueblo ruins of the Galisteo Basin, New Mexico / by N.C. Nelson –Some Indian land marks of the North Shore / by Frank R. Grover —The Kamia of imperial valley / by E.W. Gifford —Indian costumes in the United States / by Clark Wissler –Huichol-Indianernes ornamentik / af Carl Lumholtz –Perforated Indian Crania in Michigan / by W.B. Hinsdale and Emerson F. Greenman –Shawnese traditions : C.C. Trowbridge’s account / edited by Vernon Kinietz and Erminie W. Voegelin –American quillwork : a possible clue to its origin / by H. Ling Roth.

 

Analytical Environmental Services, and United States. Environmental Assessment: Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation Fee-to-Trust Acquisition. Sacramento, Calif: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Pacific Region, 2009. San Diego Public Library.

 

Anderson, Candy, Diana Caldeira, and Roberta Labastida. The Kumeyaay: Secrets of the Trail. [San Diego, Calif.]: San Diego County Office of Education, 1996. San Diego State University Library.

 

Anderson, M. Kat, and Frank K. Lake. 2013. “California Indian Ethnomycology and Associated Forest Management”. Journal of Ethnobiology. 33, no. 1: 33-85. University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Riverside, California State University Fullerton. Abstract: Many California Indian tribes utilized mushrooms for food, medicine, and/or technological purposes. This paper summarizes which mushrooms were important to different California Indian tribes in historic and modern times and how they were harvested, prepared, and stored. Oral interviews were conducted and the ethnographic literature reviewed to detail the extent and complexity of indigenous knowledge about fungi harvesting and associated burning to enhance mushroom populations and their habitats. Through two case studies, we review indigenous burning practices of several tribes in the lower montane mixed conifer forests of the central and southern Sierra Nevada, and the mixed evergreen forests of northern California. We explore the potential ecological effects of burning on these forests at different levels of biological organization and conclude by offering suggestions for research, management, and restoration practices needed to perpetuate usable mushrooms.

 

Ashley, Jeffrey S., and Secody J. Hubbard. Negotiated Sovereignty: Working to Improve Tribal-State Relations. Westport, Conn: Praeger, 2004. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Riverside, California State University Fullerton. Summary: Examines ways that tribal/state relations can be improved in the United States. Contents: I: The history and background –1. Introduction –2. The setting: federalism, intergovernmental relations, and vacillating views toward tribal governments –3. Sovereignty and the state-tribal relationship –II: Real world tribal-state interaction —4. The Campo Band of Kumeyaay Indians –5. The Navajo nation –6. The Puyallup tribe –7. The confederated Salish-Kootenai tribes of the flathead nation –8. The Shoshone-Bannock tribes –9. The St. Regis Mohawk nation –III: Looking forward –10. Conclusions: new directions for state-tribal relations.

 

Banks, James A. California Communities. Princeton, N.J.: Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic, 2007. [Audiobook, Juvenile Audience]  Contents: Geography handbook –Communities and geography: Life in communities; Geography of communities —Native American communities: California’s first peoples;Kumeyaay —Communities change: Newcomers leave their mark; Communities over time –Communities at work: People use money; Communities produce goods –Many communities, one nation: Governing the United States; Celebrating America –Reference section: Holidays; Atlas; Gazetteer; Biographical dictionary; Glossary; California framework, Historical and social sciences analysis skills, History-social science content standards grade 3 continuity and change.

 

Barsewisch, Alexandra von. Kumeyaay Courses Astride La Línea: An Account of Cross-Border Contacts and Collaborations of an Indigenous Community at the California Border. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2011. University of California, Los Angeles, University of Arizona, College of Law Library, Stanford University Libraries, University of New Mexico-Main Campus. Contents: Contents: Separation of the Kumeyaay people – Preservation of cultural knowledge and practices – Indigenous cultural renaissance – Lost cultural components – Border Situation. Summary: Deals with the meaning of factual and symbolic borders and ways by which these are overcome on the basis of regular activities or in representational and political discourses.

 

Baxter, Pat. Southern California Indian Rock Art: [Exhibition], University of California, San Diego, the Art Gallery, 1973. [La Jolla]: [The Gallery], 1973. University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California Los Angeles, UC Berkeley Libraries. Table of contents: Introduction / Pat Baxter –Chumash / Tom Huston –Luiseño / Nina MacConnel, Kim Robert MacConnel –Northern Diegueño / Sara Sealander –Southern Diegueño / Tirzo Gonzales –Mohave / Kathy Esty, Pat Baxter.

 

Bean, Lowell John, and Thomas C. Blackburn. Native Californians: A Theoretical Retrospective. Ramona, Calif: Ballena Press, 1976. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. Some explanations for the rise of cultural complexity in Native California with comments on proto-agriculture and agriculture / by Lowell John Bean & Harry Lawton –Ecology and adaptive response among the Tolowa Indians of northwestern California / by R.A. Gould –Culture-environment integration : external references in Yokuts life / by Anna H. Gayton –Social organization in Native California / by Lowell John Bean –Social organization and status differentiation among the Nomlaki / by Walter Goldschmidt –Yokuts-Mono chiefs and shamans / by Anna H. Gayton –Ceremonial integration and social interaction in aboriginal California / by Thomas Blackburn –Flexibility in sib affiliation among the Diegueño / by Katharine Luomala –The Pomo kin group and the political unit in aboriginal California / by Peter H. Kunkel –Chumash inter-village economic exchange / by Chester King –The socio-psychological significance of death among the Pomo Indians / by B.W. Aginsky –Mohave soul concepts / by George Devereux –Emphasis on industriousness among the Atsugewi / by Thomas R. Garth, Jr. –Religion and its role among the Luiseño / by Raymond White –The development of a Washo shaman / by Don Handelman –Power and its applications in Native California / by Lowell John Bean.

 

Bierhorst, John. A cry from the earth music of the North American Indians. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, 2003. [Juvenile Audience, Audio Recording] University of California, Riverside, Los Angeles Public Library, California Institute of the Arts, University of California, Santa Barbara. Wildcat dance (Diegueño) –

 

Bierhorst, John. The Red Swan: Myths and Tales of the American Indians. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1976. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside, University of Redlands. The lure of the serpent. The birth of knowledge / Digueño –

 

Blackburn, Thomas C., and Kat Anderson. Before the Wilderness: Environmental Management by Native Californians. Menlo Park, CA: Ballena Press, 1993. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. Contents:  An important article on Kumeyaay plant husbandry by Florence Shipek is included..

 

Bober, Michael, and E. C. Krupp. Watcher of the Winter Sun. S.l: s.n.], 1996. [Video Recording] La Sierra University, Austin College, University of Maryland Libraries. Abstract: Describes the native people, rock art, and winter solstice site of the La Rumorosa plateau of northern Baja California. Depicts, with lapse-time views, the illumination of a Kumeyaay rock art site by the winter solstice sunrise. Notes: Originally issued as a motion picture in 1983.

 

Boulé, Mary Null, and Daniel Liddell. Ipai-Tipai Tribes (Diegueño). Vashon, Wash: Merryant Pub, 1992. [Juvenile Audience] Coronado Public Library, Orange County Public Libraries, Santa Ana College, Cerritos Library, Santa Fe Springs Library, Covina Public Library.

 

Boyle, Maida Borel. An Ethno-Historic Reconstruction of Diegueño Subsistence Patterns–C1850 to 1950. Thesis (M.A.)–University of Southern California, 1965. University of Southern California.

 

Brooks, Roy L. When Sorry Isn’t Enough: The Controversy Over Apologies and Reparations for Human Injustice. New York: New York University Press, 1999. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, Legal Research Center, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. Abstract: “This anthology is a collection of essays, written by both internationally renowned and emerging scholars, and of public documents that concern claims from around the world which seek redress for human injustice”—Preface. Contents: Statement of the Honorable Anthony R. Pico, Chairman, Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians, Press Conference –

Cabrillo Festival Historic Seminar. The Impact of European Exploration and Settlement on Local Native Americans. San Diego, CA: Cabrillo Historical Association, 1986. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, California State University, Stanislaus.

 

Cabrillo Festival Historical Seminar. The People Cabrillo Met: Who Were They? What Were Their Customs? What Was Their Life Style? What Was the Impact on the Indians. [San Diego, Calif.?]: Cabrillo Historical Association, 1976. University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside, Autry National Center, University of Arizona Libraries.

 

Cabrillo Historical Association. Cabrillo’s World: A Commemorative Edition of Cabrillo Festival Historic Seminar Papers. San Diego, Calif: Cabrillo Historical Association, 1991. The Claremont Colleges, Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens, Autry National Center, UC Berkeley Libraries. Contents: California and Cabrillo / Abraham P. Nasatir –An account of Cabrillo’s voyage / translated by James R. Moriarty and Mary Keistman –Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo and his men of the sea / Harry Kelsey –It’s a wonder that they ever got home / Jerry MacMullen — Before the strangers / Richard L. Carrico –The impact of Europeans upon Kumeyaay culture / Florence C. Shipek.

 

Carrico, Richard L., and Ronald V. May. Two Papers on the Archaeology of San Diego County. [San Diego]: San Diego County Archaeological Society, 1975. San Diego State University Library, University of California, Riverside, California State University, Los Angeles, Autry National Center, California State University, Northridge. Carrico, R.L. and Ainsworth, P.W. The Bancroft ranch house.–May, R.V. Suggestive evidence of prehistoric cultural contact between the Southwest and the Far Southwest

 

Carrico, Richard L. Strangers in a Stolen Land. El Cajon: Sunbelt Publications, 2014 San Diego State University Library, University of California, Riverside, San Diego Public Library, California State University, Los Angeles. Carrico, R.L. and Ainsworth, P.W. The Bancroft ranch house.–May, R.V. Suggestive evidence of prehistoric cultural contact between the Southwest and the Far Southwest

{Additional Carrico Here)++Ringing Rock, Lucas, others

 

Castaneda, Terri. 2009. “American Indian Lives and Voices: The Promise and Problematics of Life Narratives”. Reviews in Anthropology. 38, no. 2: 132-165. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

 

Chaddock, Lisa Bridenstine. A Place to Gather. Thesis (M.A.)–San Diego State University, 1995. San Diego State University Library.

 

Cline, Lora L. Just Before Sunset. Jacumba, CA: J and L Enterprises, 1984. San Diego State University Library, University of California, Riverside, University of California Los Angeles. Revised edition of: The Kwaaymi. 1979. This book is a study of the Kwaaymii, a sub-group of the Kumeyaay of Southern California, not the Diegueno as indicated in the description of this item. The Kwaaymii were located in the Laguna Mountains of San Diego County, California, and the informant for the study was Tom Lucas, the last Kwaaymii. As the last survivor of his particular group, the United States Government deeded the reservation of the Kwaaymii to Tom Lucas in the 1940s. Because of his status as the last child born of his group, the elders of the tribe shared information with Tom so that he could carry on their traditions.

Cline, Lora L. The Kwaaymii: Reflections on a Lost Culture. El Centro, Calif: IVC Museum Society, 1980. San Diego State University Library, University of California, Riverside, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, University of Southern California, California State University, Northridge.

 

Coleman, Kate, and George Herzog. [United States, California, Campo, Diegueño Indians, 1927]. 1927. [Audio Recording]  Indiana University, Archives of Traditional Music. Notes: Diegueño songs. Accompanied by item description sheets, Herzog’s field notes, song texts in Diegueño and musical transcriptions. Contents: Yuma peon (gambling) songs –Yuma wildcat (fonome) dance song series –Yuma takuk dance song series –Isa (birds) dance song –E’sir (pinon bird) dance song –Tolcache ceremony –Holui dance from mourning ceremony –Tipaí dance song —
Girl’s adolescence ceremony –Keruk dance song from Image ceremony –Last song of mourning ceremony.

 

Corbusier, William Henry, Jesse Walter Fewkes, A. L. Kroeber, and Amiel Weeks Whipple. Indian Language Vocabularies of William Henry Corbusier. 1851. Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens. Abstract: The majority of items in this group are vocabulary lists for the languages of several Arizona and California Indian groups including the Cahuilla, Cupeno, Diegueno, Hualapai, Yavapai, and the Yuma. Some of the vocabulary lists have introductions regarding the history of the Indian group and the rules of the language. There are also typescripts of two articles written by Amiel Whipple and Alfred L. Kroeber, regarding California Indians, that Corbusier annotated with his notes. There is also an essay regarding Corbusier’s time in the military and General George Crook and the 5th U.S. Cavalry’s dealings with the Tonto Apache leader Delshay. Also included are two Indian folk tales, How Wolf’s Son Became a Star (Hualapai), and How Whets-A-Whets Went Up to the Fourth Heaven (Yuma); the stories are written in the Indian language and English. There is also a copy of a letter by Corbusier to Jesse Walter Fewkes.

 

Couro, Ted, Margaret Langdon, and Leanne Hinton. Let’s Talk Iipay Aa: an Introduction to the Mesa Grande Diegueno Language. Banning, Calif: Malki Museum Press, 1975. San Diego State University Library , University of California, San Diego , University of California, Irvine , University of California, Riverside .

 

Cuero, Delfina, and Florence Connolly Shipek. Delfina Cuero: Her Autobiography, an Account of Her Last Years, and Her Ethnobotanic Contributions. Menlo Park, Ca: Ballena Press, 1991. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. Foreword to Delfina Cuero –Preface / Lowell John Bean –Introduction / Florence Connolly Shipek –Pronunciation guide / Margaret Landon –The autobiography –Epilogue –An account of the rest of her life / Florence Connolly Shipek –Her ethnobotanic contributions / as recorded by Florence Connolly Shipek.

 

Dago Braves. Kumeyaay Cool Guyz. [San Diego, Calif.]: Shulaced, 2008. [Audio Recording] Edmonton Public Library. Contents: Intro (Kumeyaay cool shit) –Ima brave –Fly casino –Too soon (ft. TommyRedding) –What it don’t do (ft. I-Rocc & Lil Man) –Same shit different hoes (ft. Smigg Dirtee) –Wit ma chain on (ft. Tommy Redding) –Born 2B on top (ft. Los Da Monsta) –Paper chase –Where yo gurl at (ft. J. Diggs) –She wasn’t n love wit me (ft. Tyrone) –For the family –Lose’n you –Grown ass women –Bitches & money –Hollabacc (ft. Dubee) –Lil Indians.

 

Davis, Edward H. Early Cremation Ceremonies of the Luiseño and Diegueño Indians of Southern California. New York: Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, 1921. University of California, Irvine, University of the West Library, Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens, University of California, Los Angeles.

 

Davis, Edward H. Edward H. Davis Papers in the Huntington Free Library, 1910-1929. Bronx, NY: Huntington Free Library and Reading Room, 1998.  Autry National Center, California State Library. Field notebooks, sketchbooks, manuscripts, and correspondence, pertaining primarily to Indians of California and into Mexico. Includes index. Includes information about reservations, artifacts, ruins, ceremonies, descriptions of wildlife, landscapes, languages, and archeological notes. Tribes mentioned include, Pima, Seri, Mayo, Yaqui, Nayarit (Cora), Yuma, Opata, Modoc, Paiute, Diegueño, Cahuilla, and Soboba Indians.

 

Davis, Edward H. The Diegueño Ceremony of the Death Images. New York: Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, 1919. San Diego Public Library, University of California, Irvine, Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens, Los Angeles Public Library.

 

Davis, Emma Lou, and William Allan. Diegueno Coiled Baskets. San Diego, California: San Diego Museum of Man, 1967. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Riverside, Autry National Center.

 

DeSomber, Myrna Ann. Changing Play Patterns Among the Kumeyaay Diegueño Indians. Thesis (M..A.) San Diego State University,1975. San Diego State University Library, University of California, Los Angeles.

 

Doris Duke Foundation. American Indian Oral History Collection. 1967. University of New Mexico-Main Campus. Oral traditions and recollections of Native Americans, 1967-1972. Contains 901 reel to reel audio tapes, 970 typed transcripts and 5 linear feet of contemporary newspaper clippings on Indian affairs. The bulk of the material is from Navajo and Pueblo informants. Other tribes represented are from Southern Calif., Washington, Montana and Alaska. Personal and family histories represent a large part of the material. They include information on social culture, education, ceremonies, legends, language, government, history, descriptions of boundaries, early irrigation practices and land and water usage. Historical subjects reported from a Native American perspective include the Pueblo Revolt, brief tribal histories, traditional hunting practices and public works programs. Historical and contemporary inter-tribal relations and relations with the U.S. Government are described, as are traditional accounts of relations with the Spanish. The miscellaneous series contains commentaries on the 1968 Indian Civil Rights Act, the Red Power movement and the occupation of Alcatraz. Recorded meetings held around Albuquerque on education and Indian rights are also included. Interviews with Navajo, Acoma, Cochiti, Hopi, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, Nambe, Picuris, Sandia, San Felipe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Santa Ana, Santa Clara, Taos, Tesuque, Zia, Zuni, Apache, Eskimo, Koyukuk, Nunamiut, Cahuilla, Diegueno, Callam, Nez Perce, Blackfeet and Cheyenne informants. Recorded meetings include the National Congress of American Indians Convention, 1969; University of New Mexico Kiva Club, 1970; Navajo Education Conference, 1970; National Indian Education Conference, 1971; Gallup Inter-tribal Ceremonial, 1968; and Head Start, 1970

 

Dozier, Deborah Susan Wenzel. Kumeyaay Basketry: Resource Management As an Economic Strategy. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of California, Riverside, 2000. San Diego State University Library, University of California, Riverside, University of California, Davis.

 

Du Bois, Constance Goddard. 1908. “Ceremonies and Traditions of the Diegueno Indians”. Journal of American Folklore : Journal of the American Folklore Society. California State Library.

 

DuBois, Constance Goddard, Frederick Webb Hodge, A. L. Kroeber, Otis T. Mason, Mary C. B. Watkins, and Clark Wissler. Constance Goddard DuBois Papers. 1897. Autry National Center, California State Library, Cornell University Library. Abstract: The papers include her field notes from her summers in California, notes on her activities with the Connecticut Indian Association, and newspaper clippings relating to Indian affairs, particularly those in California. Drafts of manuscripts for her publications on Luiseno religion, Diegueno mythology, and other subjects relating to the Mission Indians of California are included in the collection. Letters written to Du Bois from 1897 to 1909 comprise a significant part of the collection. Correspondents from Alfred Kroeber, Otis T. Mason, Mary C. B. Watkins, Frederick W. Hodge, and Clark Wissler, as well as with representatives of Indian-aid organizations such as the Indian Industrial League and the Indian Rights Association. Other correspondence to DuBois, her notes and manuscripts on Indians of California including the Diegueño and Luiseño Indians. One folder about Robert Wilcox and the Hawaiian Rebellion. Folders with information about mythology, religion, industry, art, missions, language, vocabulary, biographical information, and newspaper clippings. Includes index of correspondence. Field notebooks, date books, and diary books. Contents: Reel #1: Folder #1 Partial Calendar – Folder #10 Correspondence 1905 –Reel #2: Folder #11 Correspondence 1906 – Folder #23 Indian Summer in S. California –Reel #3: Folder #24 Indian Summer in California – Folder #46C Clippings & Indian … –Reel #4: Folder #47 Miscellaneous Notes – Folder #62 Generous Bore —
Reel #5: Folder #63 – #72 Notebook –Reel #6: Folder #73-#89 Field Notes.

 

DuBois, Constance Goddard. Constance Goddard DuBois mission Indian papers. 1900. Autry National Center. This is a collection of notes made by Constance Goddard DuBois regarding Mission Indian games, history, language, music, and names. Notes are undated.

 

DuBois, Constance Goddard. Diegueño Mortuary Ollas. United States: s.n, 1907. Northwestern University. Reprinted from American anthropologist, v. 9, no. 3, July-Sept., 1907.

 

DuBois, Constance Goddard. Mythology of the Dieguenos, Mission Indians of San Diego County, Cal. 1902. Palm Springs Public Library, University of British Columbia Library.

 

DuBois, Constance Goddard. Papers, 1897-1909. New York State Historical Documents. Abstract: Collection includes Du Bois’ research notes and correspondence on Luiseño and Diegueño Indians in Mesa Grande, Mesa Campo and Mesa Pala in Southern California. Du Bois’ interests ranged from religion and games to arts and industries of these Indians. Correspondents include Alfred Kroeber, Mary C.B. Watkins, John S. Lockwood, and Edward H. Davis. A calendar summarizes contents of each letter. Her research notes describe myths, religious beliefs, basketry, sand painting, history of Mission Indians, dances, linguistics, and her philosophy for understanding American Indians. Her research notes also contain texts of legends told to her by Indians. Also, text of speech about Mission Indian myths, musical scores to their songs and dances, manuscripts of many of her papers, reprints of articles, and news clippings about California Indians. Daybooks concern her daily field work operations; some writings refer to her attempts to secure United States government relief to Mission Indians. There are also programs for anthropological meetings. A list of 213 questions she typically asked in the field is of special interest.

 

DuBois, Constance Goddard. Religious Ceremonies and Myths of the Mission Indians. 1905. UC Berkeley Libraries, Harvard University. Extract from American anthropologist, new ser., v. 7, no. 4, Oct.-Dec. 1905.

 

DuBois, Constance Goddard. The Mythology of the Diegueños, Mission Indians of San Diego County, California, As Proving Their Status to Be Higher Than Is Generally Believed. [Easton, Pa.]: [Eschenbach Print. Co.], 1905. UC Berkeley Libraries, California State University, Sacramento, California State Library, Southern Oregon University Library, American Museum of Natural History. Detached from: Proceedings of the International Congress of Americanists, 13th session, New York, 1902.

 

DuBois, Constance Goddard, and A. L. Kroeber. The Religion of the Luiseño Indians of Southern California. Berkeley: The University Press, 1908. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens. Appendix I. Games, arts, and industries of the Diegueños and Luiseños. By Constance Goddard Du Bois”: p. 167-173.

 

DuBois, Constance Goddard. The Story of the Chaup: A Myth of the Diegueños. United States: s.n], 1904. Northwestern University. Detached from Journal of American folk-lore, v. 17, October-December, 1904, no. 67.

 

Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (Mexico), and Chiapas Media Project. The other campaign indigenous voices from the north. Part 2. Part 2. Chicago: Chiapas Media Project-Promedios, 2008. [Video Recording] University of Arizona Libraries, University of Wisconsin – Madison, General Library System, University of Notre Dame, University of Pittsburgh. Abstract: As part of the Other Campaign, Zapatas speak with indigineous peoples of Baja California about their communities and their survival. Notes: Dialogue in Spanish with English subtitles. Contents: From San José de la Zorra, northwestern Mexico –Cucapas and Kiliwas 9,000 years later.

Ensign, Gloria L. Native California Era. San Diego, Calif: San Diego City Schools, Community Relations and Integration Services Division, Race/Human Relations, Old Town Historical/Cultural Program, 1984. San Diego State University Library. Abstract: Curriculum material for teaching elementary students about the pre-Spanish era in an area that later became San Diego, Calif. Contents: Introduction to the trails of the Kumeyaay –Arts of the Kumeyaay –Food of the Kumeyaay –Games and toys of the Kumeyaay –Initiation ceremonies –Kumeyaay clothing and adornment –Kumeyaay homes –Kumeyaay language –Myths and legends of the Kumeyaay –Pictographs, petrographs and petroglyphs –The Relationship between the Kumeyaay and native plants –Shamanism and the religious beliefs and healing practices of the Kumeyaay –Territorialism, ownership and warfare —
Trade –White deer (a modern legend) –Race/human relations activity.

Faecke, Renee. A Study of the Impact of Federal Assimilation Policy on the Kumeyaay Indians of the Sycuan Reservation, the Mission Creek Band of the Mission Creek Reservation, and the Cupeño and Luiseño Indians of the Pala Reservation. Thesis (MA)–California State University, Fullerton, 2006. California State University Fullerton, Autry National Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California State Library.

 

Fetzer, Leland. The Cuyamacas: The Story of San Diego’s High Country, 1772-2003. San Diego, CA: Sunbelt Publications, 2009. San Diego Public Library, University of California, San Diego, Allen County Public Library, Cornell University Library, Library of Congress. Contents: A Cuyamaca chronology –The land and its first people –The land –Cuyamaca Kumeyaay –Between discovery and conquest, 1772-1846 –Pedro Fages and other early explorers in the Cuyamacas –Between Fages and Kearny, 1785-1846 –Grass, gold, and apples, 1846-1910 –American travelers –Early settlers –Julian City and Banner City are born –Julian City and Banner City hang tough –The Cuyamacas blossom –Cuyamaca Indian villages and reservations –T.S. Van Dyke’s great Cuyamaca water scheme –Guatay becomes Descanso –The automobile age, 1910-2003 –The Cuyamacas early in the twentieth century –Cuyamaca Rancho State Park –Cuyamaca North and Cuyamaca South, 1910-1960 –The 1960s and 1970s : preserving the landscape, preserving the past –Land questions –Big animals and big fires –Holocaust.

 

Field, Margaret, and Jon Meza Cuero. 2012. “Kumeyaay Oral Tradition, Cultural Identity, and Language Revitalization”. Oral Tradition. 27, no. 2. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of Redlands.

 

Fintzelberg, Nicholas M. Peyote Paraphernalia. San Diego, Calif: San Diego Museum of Man, 1969. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Los Angeles, Arizona State University Libraries, University of Arizona Libraries.

Fitzgerald, Stephanie. 2006. “Intimate Geographies: Reclaiming Citizenship and Community in “The Autobiography of Delfina Cuero” and Bonita Nunez’s “Diaries”. American Indian Culture and Research Journal. 30, no. 1: 109-130. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, Legal Research Center, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. Abstract: American Indian women’s autobiographies recount a specific type of life experience that has often been overlooked, one that is equally important in understanding the genre and to develop ways of reading these texts that balance the recovery and recognition of the Native voice and agency contained within them with the processes of creation and the contexts of production that shape them. In this essay, the author considers collaborative autobiographies by two American Indian women, those of Delfina Cuero, a Kumeyaay woman born in 1900 in an “Indian house under an old grove of trees” in Jamacha, near San Diego, California, and of Bonita Nunez, a Poyomkowish or Luiseno of the Rincon band, born twelve years earlier and some forty-eight miles to the north. Coming from often overlooked tribal groups, Cuero and Nunez’s texts probe the complex relationship of law and American Indian identity in the twentieth century. As a nonreservation Kumeyaay woman displaced from her traditional lands in the San Diego area to Baja California, Mexico, Cuero was unable to prove her US origin to the satisfaction of immigration officials. Nunez was adopted at birth from what was to become the Rincon Reservation by a wealthy white woman, and was forever separated from her birth family and tribal community. Through historical and political circumstances beyond their control, both women become relegated to the margins of not only history, but also Indian community and Indian identity. The author contends that Cuero and Nunez use life-writing as a tool to interrogate and secure their legal and social identity as Indian women during an era of tremendous social change. The personal narratives of Delfina Cuero and Bonita Nunez are but two examples from a genre that is as diverse and as complex as Indian America. At the same time, these narratives disrupt the expectations that readers and critics have come to assume for American Indian autobiography. Their life experiences depart from the “traditional” story line, and the setting is not the Great Plains or Southwest, but southern California and Mexico. Furthermore, their stories are of daily subsistence and survival in the margins of both Indian and US history. At the same time, their life stories force to confront crucial issues of Indian legal and cultural identity, and their effect on individual lives. (Contains 95 notes.)

Forbes, A. S. C. 1902. “Lace Making by Indian Women”. Out West : a Magazine of the Old Pacific and the New. 16, no. 6. UC Berkeley Libraries. Indian textile fabrics — Mesa Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Mesa Grande Reservation, California.

Gallucci, Karen Louise. From the Desert to the Mountains: Salton Brownware Pottery in the Mountains of San Diego. Thesis (M.A.)–San Diego State University, 2001. San Diego State University Library.

 

Gamble, Lynn H., and Michael Wilken-Robertson. 2008. “Kumeyaay Cultural Landscapes of Baja California’s Tijuana River Watershed”. Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology. 28, no. 2: 127-151.

 

Gamble, Lynn H., and Scott Matttingly. 2012. “Pine nut processing in southern California: is the absence of evidence the evidence of absence?” American Antiquity. 77, no. 2: 263-278.

 

Gamble, L. H., and I. C. Zepeda. 2002. “Social Differentiation and Exchange Among the Kumeyaay Indians During the Historic Period in California”. HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY. 36: 71-91. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, Riverside, University of Redlands.

 

Garduño, Everardo. 2003. “The Yumans of Baja California, Mexico: From Invented to Imagined and Invisible Communities”. Journal of Latin American Anthropology. 8, no. 1: 4-37. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, California State University Fullerton. Abstract: Este articulo es una aproximación al proceso de construcción de redes sociales y etnicidad entre los indígenas yumanos de Baja California, México. Cuestionando a los enfoques tradicionales que reiteradamente han anunciado la extinción y asimilación de estos grupos, aqui se sugiere un nuevo marco teórico para su estudio. Conceptos centrales de esta propuesta son los conceptos de comunidad transnational, comunidad imaginada e hiperespacio, los cuales nos revelan las formas en que los yumanos permanecen comprometidos en la elaboración de nuevas formas de organización social y auto-referencia étnica, a través de la construcción de redes sociales que incluyen (aunque no se limitan) a los grupos lingüisticamente relacionados que habitan en los Estados Unidos. Así, el presente trabajo sosriene que los indígenas yumanos se encuentran experimentando un proceso de deconstrucción de las formas oficialmente promovidas (o impuestas) de comunidad (las comunidades inventadas), a traves de la construccion de comunidades imaginadas e invisibles.

 

Gayton, A. H. 1935. “Areal Affiliations of California Folktales”. American Anthropologist. 37, no. 4: 582-599. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

 

Gerow, Bert A. Bert A. Gerow Collection of Photographs of Southern California Indian Basketry. Ethnological Documents of the Department and Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley. 1900. UC Berkeley Libraries. Contain photoprints of Cahuilla (85), Luiseño (36), Chemehuevi (20), Gabrieleño (4), Diegueño (22), Juaneño (8), Serrano (6), Coahuilla (2), Chumash (15), and unidentified “Mission Indian” (474) baskets. Gathered originally from the University of California, the American Museum of Natural History, the Southwestern, Peabody, Field, and Los Angeles County Museums for a dissertation project that later was abandoned.

 

Gifford, Edward Winslow. Dichotomous Social Organization in South Central California. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1916. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of Redlands.

 

Gifford, Edward Winslow. Northern Diegueño Field Notes 1919. Berkeley, Calif: University Archives, Bancroft Library, University of California, 1996. UC Berkeley Libraries.

 

Gifford, Edward Winslow. The Kamia of Imperial Valley. Washington: U.S. G.P.O., 1931. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, California State University Fullerton, California State University, Los Angeles.

 

Goddard, Pliny Earle. 1914. “THE PRESENT CONDITION OF OUR KNOWLEDGE OF NORTH AMERICAN LANGUAGES”. American Anthropologist. 16, no. 4: 555-601. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside, University of Redlands.

 

Graff, Rebecca S. Collecting Culture: An Investigation into the Ethics of Museum Collecting and the Ethical History of the Hearst Museum’s Kumeyaay Pottery Collection. Thesis (senior honors in Anthropology)–University of California, Berkeley, May, 1999. UC Berkeley Libraries.

 

Gray-Kanatiiosh, Barbara A. Kumeyaay. Edina, Minn: ABDO Pub. Co, 2007. [Juvenile Audience] Coronado Public Library, Orange County Public Libraries, University of California, Riverside, Cerritos Library, Santa Fe Springs Library, County of Los Angeles Public Library. Abstract: Discusses the Kamia Indians located in southern California, their way of life such as food, houses, clothing, crafts, family, contact with Europeans, and their life today. Contents: Where they lived –Society –Food –Homes –Clothing –Crafts –Family –Children –Myths –War —
Contact with Europeans –Famous leader –The people today.

 

Greater San Diego Chamber of Commerce, and San Diego Chamber of Commerce. The Story of San Diego. San Diego: Economic Research Bureau of the Greater San Diego Chamber of Commerce, 1990. San Diego Public Library. Booklet contains information on: Juan Cabrillo, Junipero Serra, the Diegueno Indians, the Presidio, San Diego de Alcala Mission and Old Town.

 

Guerrero, Monica C. Hual-Cu-Cuish: A Late Prehistoric Kumeyaay Village Site in the Cuyamaca Rancho State Park, San Diego County, California. Thesis (M.A.)–San Diego State University, 2001. San Diego State University Library.

 

Hamilton, Sam. Discovering Mission San Diego De Alcalá. New York : Cavendish Square, 2015. [Juvenile Audience] Cerritos Library, County of Los Angeles Public Library, City of Commerce Public Library, Los Angeles Public Library, Pasadena Public Library, Santa Monica Public Library. Abstract: Learn about the rich history of Mission San Diego de Alcalá: how it started, the people who ran it, the indigenous population, and its legacy today. Contents: The Spanish explore San Diego –The Kumeyaay –The mission system –Founding Mission San Diego de Alcalá –Early days of the Mission –Daily life –Troubles and hardships –Secularization –The Mission today –Make your own mission model –Key dates in mission history –Glossary —
Pronunciation guide –Find out more –Index.

Harrington, John Peabody. Ethnographic Notes on the Diegeuno.  California and Baja California. Originals on file at the Smithsonian.  Microfilm available at the University of California Riverside.

 

Harris, David R., and Gordon C. Hillman. Foraging and Farming: The Evolution of Plant Exploitation. London: Unwin Hyman, 1989. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Riverside, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. Abstract: A study of plant exploitation and early agriculture in a worldwide context with studies from the Andes, China, Australia and North America. It views human exploitation of plant resources as a global evolutionary process which incorporated the beginnings of cultivation and crop domestication. Contents: An example of intensive plant husbandry : the Kumeyaay of southern California / Florence C. Shipek –

 

Ha-ta-kek, Laguna Jim, José Trinidad, and Constance Goddard DuBois. [United States, California, Diegueño Indians, ca. 1905]. 1905. [Audio Recording] Indiana University, Archives of Traditional Music.  Notes: Diegueño songs and instrumental music.Accompanied by item description sheets, a catalog prepared by Naomi Ware and references. Recorded by DuBois ca. 1905 at Warner’s Ranch in San Jose [?] and at other unidentified locations in California during the Ethnological and Archeological survey of California conducted by University of California, Berkeley; sound quality fair to good. Contents: Song of the eagle feather skirt dance –Gambling songs –Flute music –Indian fiesta –Song of Toloache fiesta –Girl’s arrival at womanhood –Songs from image dance –Song for the dead –Unidentified songs.

 

Harvey, Sioux. Igniting Tribal Fires: Indian Sovereignty, Gaming, and Incorporation into the World-System, 1946-1996. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Southern California, 1999.  University of California Los Angeles, University of Southern California, Arizona State University Libraries, University of New Mexico-Main Campus. Contents: pt. 1. Defining sovereignty, incorporation, and a literature review –pt. 2. Five layers of political and cultural incorporation on the Federal level, 1946-1996: Indians’ move into the world of policy formation and implementation –pt. 3. Three case studies of political, economic and cultural incorporation at the tribal level: the experiences of the Mashantucket Pequot, the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay and the Navajo Nation in building sovereignty, 1946-1996.

 

Hayes, Benjamin Ignatius, and Panto. Diegueño Vocabulary. 1939. Autry National Center. Abstract:  This collection consists of two typed sheets of Diegueño vocabulary furnished by Panto, a captain of San Pasqual, to Benjamin Hayes at an unknown date. Diegueño words syllabified, English to Diegueño, except geographic locations, which are Diegueño to English. Note from Frederick Webb Hodge: See article by Arthur Woodward in The Masterkey, 1934 September.

 

Hedges, Ken. A Rabbitskin Blanket from San Diego County. San Diego, Calif: San Diego Museum of Man, 1973. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, Palm Springs Public Library, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

 

Hedges, Kenneth Everett. An Analysis of Diegueño Pictographs. Thesis (M.A.) San Diego State College,   1970. San Diego State University Library, Palomar College.

 

Hedges, Ken. Notes on the Kumeyaay: A Problem of Identification. Journal of California Anthropology, The. eScholarship, University of California, 1975. Abstract: For over fifty-five years, one of the most persistent problems in southern California anthropology has been the identification of the people called Kamia. In recent years, the question has arisen anew as anthropologists have begun to work more intensively with the southern California Yuman groups. Some of the Southern Diegueno have adopted the name Kumeyaay for themselves, and a reexamination of the old term Kamia and all of its variations is long overdue. The following list of historical and ethnographic references is presented to provide background for my own comments which follow, for Margaret Langdon’s paper on the etymology of Kumeyaay and Kamia which also appears in this issue of the Journal, and for future work on the subject. The list does not pretend to be complete, but does contain the major references to variants of the term Kumeyaay. The list is presented chronologically. Whenever possible, the years in which the data were recorded are used as reference dates; publication dates often are several or many years later. Except for direct citations, the terms Kamia, Kumeyaay, Diegueiio, Cahuilla, Mojave, Quechan (often called Yuma), and Cocopa are used in this paper, in preference to the many orthographic variants which appear in the literature.

 

Hedges, Ken. Santa Ysabel Ethnobotany. San Diego, Calif: San Diego Museum of Man, 1986. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Riverside, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

 

Heizer, Robert F. Some Last Century Accounts of the Indians of Southern California. Ramona, Calif: Ballena Press, 1976. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside, University of Redlands. Coahuilla Indians (1892) / J.H. Gilmour –An Indian prophet (1892) / J.H. Gilmour –Indian politicians (1892) / J.H. Gilmour –A model Indian camp (1892) / J.H. Gilmour –The Indian question (1892) / J.H. Gilmour –Indian justice (1892) / J.H. Gilmour –Thrifty Agent Rust (1892) / Anonymous –The Cohuilla Indians (1889) / T.F. Drew —
The method of manufacturing pottery and baskets among the Indians of Southern California (1880) / P. Schumacher –The Cohuilla Indians (1889) / T.F. Drew –Eagle Fiesta of the California Indians (1857) / J.J. Warner –San Luis Rey Indians (1889) / Anonymous –Eagle dance of the Mesa Grande Tribe (1907) / Anonymous —A Diegueno Fiesta at Mesa Grande (1900) / C.G. Du Bois —A fiesta at Warner’s Ranch (1899) / H.N. Rust –Indian Reservation in San Diego County (1870) –A tragic sequel to Ramona (1894) / E.E. Howell.

 

Hicks Dunn, Dana Ruth. Strategies for Survival: Indian Transitions in the Mountains of San Diego County, 1846-1907. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of California, Riverside, 2013, 2013. University of California, Riverside. Abstract: Survival Strategies were chosen by Indians in the mountains of northern San Diego County from 1846 to 1907 according to their personal, individual transition situation and needs of their families, tribes and clans. These choices were complex and varied from clan to clan and village to village. Americans arrived and permanently settled in San Diego, California in 1846 during the Mexican War. By 1850 California had become a part of the United States. In 1848, gold was discovered in northern California and American Easterners received word of free, rich lands to the west. Luiseño, Iipay, Diegueño and Cupeño Indians adhered to their wisest choices in survival strategies according to the abrupt and immense changes that were overcoming them such as the organization of American law that affected them profoundly, American thievery of Indian land and resources, forced removals of villages and the establishment of reservations. Indian lives would never be the same. As Americans continued to flood onto Indian lands, Indians came under more and more pressure. During this time period, Indians responded with many strategies for survival from diplomacy to revolt, always choosing what was best for their families and the coherence of their socio-cultural foundations. These strategies carried and reflected the thread of ancient Indian culture, as the Luiseño, Diegueño, Iipay and Cupeño used their traditional cultural manners, traditions, oral law and customs to balance and correct the traumatic experiences raining down on them as they adapted to loss of land and resources. Luiseño, Diegueño, Iipay and Cupeño succeeded in their survival and are still alive and thriving today in the mountains of northern San Diego County. Some of their socio-cultural structure is not being utilized today, at the turn of the twenty-first century, as they have adapted to the American wave of colonization. However, they have succeeded in living wisely in two worlds and still keep Indian identity intact.

 

Hildebrand, John A., and Melissa Bilings Hagstrum. 1995. “Observing Subsistence Change in Native Southern California: the Late Prehistoric Kumeyaay”. Research in Economic Anthropology. 16: 85-127. IDS Basel Bern (IDSBB).

 

Hiles, O. J. The Mission Indians: The Sequans. S.l: s.n, 1800. University of San Diego, Legal Research Center, University of Arizona Libraries, University of Arizona, College of Law Library, University of Nebraska Omaha.

 

Hilton, William H., and E. A. Sherman. William H. Hilton’s Account of a Government Trip from San Diego to Fort Yuma in 1852. 1906. Autry National Center. This is a typed copy of a letter from William H. Hilton written to Major E. A. Sherman on 1906 October 1, recounting a pack, or wagon, train trip Hilton made for the U. S. Government from San Diego to Fort Yuma in 1852. The letter mentions an earthquake in Fort Yuma, Kearny’s expedition, Spanish missions, and the influence of Jesuit fathers on the Native Americans. The date reflects when the original letter was first written, not the date the copy was created.

 

Hinton, Leanne. 1975. “Notes on La Huerta Diegueño Ethnobotany”. The Journal of California Anthropology. 2, no. 2: 214-222. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

 

Hoffman, Geralyn Marie, and Lynn H. Gamble. A Teacher’s Guide to Historical and Contemporary Kumeyaay Culture: A Supplemental Resource for Third and Fourth Grade Teachers. [San Diego, Calif.]: Institute for Regional Studies of the Californias, San Diego State University, 2006. San Diego State University Library, San Diego Public Library, University of New Mexico-Main Campus, Library of Congress.

 

Hoffman, Geralyn Marie. The Integration of Kumeyaay History and Culture in the San Diego Social Studies Curriculum. Thesis (M.A.)–San Diego State University,  2005. San Diego State University Library.

 

Hohenthal, William D., Thomas C. Blackburn, Margaret Langdon, David B. Kronenfeld, and Lynn Thomas. Tipai Ethnographic Notes: A Baja California Indian Community at Mid-Century. Novato, CA: Ballena Press, 2001. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. Foreword / Thomas Blackburn –Linguistic Observations / Margaret Langdon –1. Historical Background –2. The Natural Environment –3. Tribes, Clans, and Territories –4. Some Notes on Prehistory and History –5. Settlements –6. Subsistence –7. Material Culture –8. Social Life –9. Law and Government –10. Religious Beliefs and Practices –11. Healing and Ethnoscience –App. B. Some Comparative Notes on Paipai and Kiliwa, 1951 –App. C. Tipai Kinship Terms / David Kronenfeld and Lynn Thomas.

 

Hohenthal, William D. William D. Hohenthal notes on the Tipai (Southern Diegueño) Indians of Lower California, Mexico. Ethnological Documents of the Department and Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley. 1948. UC Berkeley Libraries. Contents: Constitutes a nearly complete ethnographic description, with no mythology.

 

Hohenthal, W. D. 1950. “Southern Diegueǹo Use and Knowledge of Lithic Materials”. Kroeber Anthropological Society Papers. no. 2: 9-16.

 

Hudson, Millard F. 1907. “The Last Indian Campaign in the Southwest”. Pacific Monthly. 17, no. 2:. UC Berkeley Libraries, Indiana University.

 

Hyer, Joel Ross. We Are Not Savages: Native Americans in Southern California and the Pala Reservation, 1840-1920. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of California, Riverside, 1999. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, Legal Research Center, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

 

Jamul Indian Village of California. Jamul Indian Village Presents Bringing the Past to Life. Jamul, CA: Jamul Indian Village, 2001. Smithsonian Institution Libraries. Abstract: The Jamul Indian Village is proud to present “Bringing the past to life,” a 20-panel exhibit that is touring schools, colleges, museums and universities throughout California.”–Disc label.

 

Janetos, Lauren A. Missionization and Environmental Stress in Alta California: The Impact of Spanish Colonization on Kumeyaay and Quechan Society. Thesis (M.A.)–University of New Orleans, 2005. University of New Orleans.

 

Johnson, Crane. The Dieguenos. Jacumba, Calif: Jacumba Press, 1998. San Diego Public Library.

 

Jow, Stephanie Megan. Kumeyaay Identity in the San Diego Area. Thesis (M.A.)–San Diego State University, 2009, 2009. San Diego State University Library.

 

Kampf, Constance Elizabeth. Kumeyaay Online: Dimensions of Rhetoric and Culture in the Kumeyaay Web Presence. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Minnesota, 2005. Major: Rhetoric and scientific and technical communication, 2005. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

 

Keeling, Richard. Ethnographic Field Recordings at Lowie Museum of Anthropology. Berkeley, CA: California Indian Library Collections Project [distributor], 1992. California State Library, Sonoma County Library. v. 6. Southern California: Luiseño, Diegueño, and Cahuilla Indians –

Keppinger, Ravenjoy O. Food, Medicine, or Both?: Native American Ethnobotany in San Diego County. Thesis (M.A.)–San Diego State University, 2007. San Diego State University Library.

Kilborne, Benjamin. 1981. “Pattern, Structure, and Style in Anthropological Studies of Dreams”. Ethos. 9, no. 2: 165-185. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

Kilpatrick, Alan, and Mike Connolly. Indian Groups … Issues. [S.l.]: Southwest Center for Environmental Research and Policy, 1997. San Diego State University Library.  Summary: Report on environmental concerns of these Southern California Indian groups and Baja California indigenous communities : The Kumeyaay (Campo reservation, San Pasqual reservation, Santa Ysabel reservation, Sycuan reservation, Viejas reservation, La Posta reservation, Cuyapaipe reservation), Luiseño (La Jolla reservation, Pala reservation, Pauma reservation, Pechanga reservation), The Cahuilla, Juntas De Neji, San José de la Zorra, San Antonio Necua/Cañon de los Encinos, La Huerta, Santa Catarina, San Isidoro, Ejido Tribu Kiliwas, and El Mayor Cucapá.

 

Knaak, Manfred. The Forgotten Artist: Indians of Anza-Borrego and Their Rock Art. Borrego Springs, Calif: Anza-Borrego Desert Natural History Association, 1988. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Riverside, University of Redlands. The land and its people –On the trail of early man –The Cahuilla and Cupeño –The Northern Diegueño –and Kumeyaay –Drawings with hammer and brush –Petroglyphs and pictographs –Rock art styles of Anza-Borrego –Scribbles or magical images? –Ritual and ceremonies recorded on stone –Fertility signs –Initiation rites for girls and boys –Sky people, ghost roads, and flocks of geese –Ritual: ever-present, all important –Shaman, the man who sees beyond the stars –The forgotten artist.

 

Kramer, Edward Hermoza, Gloria Castañeda, Deborah Dozier, Celia Montes, Mike Wilkens, Miriam Walking Stick, Abe Sanchez, and Lupe Dancin’ Bear Rivera. Survival in the weave. [Oceanside, Calif.?]: YProductions, 2005. [Video recording] University of San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Abstract: This video looks at the Kumeyaay Indians in Baja California and a master basket weaver’s part in influencing her village to turn basket weaving into a commodity.

 

Kroeber, A. L. A Mission Record of the California Indians from a Manuscript in the Bancroft Library. New York: Kraus Reprint, 1964. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. American archaeology and ethnology ;, v. 8, no. 1.

 

Kroeber, A. L. Handbook of the Indians of California. Washington: G.P.O., 1925. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

 

Kroeber, A. L. Serian, Tequistlatecan and Hokan. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1915. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside, University of Redlands. American archaeology and ethnology ;, v. 11, no. 4.

 

Kroeber, A. L., John Peabody Harrington, John A. Woodward, and A. L. Kroeber. The Diegueño Indians: Phonetic Elements of the Diegueño Language by A. L. Kroeber and J. P. Harrington ; The Anniversary: a Contemporary Diegueño Complex by John A. Woodward. Ramona, California: Acoma Books, 1975. Family History Library. Reproduction of original poublished: Berkeley : University of California Press, 1914. [Pittsburgh] : Ethnology Journal, (19–?). Also on title page: Phonetic elements of the Diegueño

language / A. L. Kroeber and J. P. Harrington. The anniversary: a contemporary Diegueño complex / John A. Woodward.

 

Kwiatkowska, Barbara J. Introduction to the Musical Culture of the Diegueño Indians from San Diego County Reservations in California. Berkeley, CA: California Indian Library Collections [distributor], 1992. California State Library. Photocopy. Originally published in: The Bulletin (Fall 1990).

 

Kwiatkowska, Barbara Jolanta. The Present State of Musical Culture Among the Diegueño Indians from San Diego County Reservations. Thesis (Ph. D.) University of California, Los Angeles, 1981. San Diego State University Library, University of California, Los Angeles, Denver Public Library.

 

Kwiatkowska, Barbara Jolanta. [United States, California, San Diego County, Diegueño Indians, 1977-1979]. 1977.  Notes: Accompanies Kwiatkowska’s dissertation, “The present state of musical culture among the Diegueño Indians from San Diego County Reservations.” Performed by Dora Curo ; George Hyde ; Alejandrina Murillo ; Adelaida Lachappa. Recorded at the Manzanita, Campo, Barona and Sycuan Reservations, San Diego, California and Ha-a, Baja California, Mexico in 1977-1979 by Barbara Jolanta Kwiatkowska. Contents: Music of the Diegueño Indians, including Bird Song, Peon Game Song and Jumping Song.

 

Kwiatkowski, Heather L. An Ethnoarchaeological Examination of Peña Blanca: A Kumeyaay Community in Baja California Norte. Thesis (M.A.)–San Diego State University,  2008. San Diego State University Library.

 

Labastida, Roberta. My Ancestors’ Village. San Diego, CA: Sunbelt Publications, 2004. [Elementary and junior high school] San Diego Public Library, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Riverside, California Academy of Sciences, University of New Mexico-Main Campus. Abstract: Describes the life of a Kumeyaay, or Kumiai, Indian girl and her family living in San Diego area long ago. Includes a glossary of Kumeyaay words and a clarification of the different Indian groups from this area.

 

Labastida, Roberta, and Diana Caldeira. The Kumeyaay People. [San Diego, Calif.]: San Diego County Office of Education, 1995. San Diego State University Library.

 

Laczko, Gina, and Chad T. Phinney. They Lived Here Too: A Special Exhibit at Pueblo Grande Museum, October 16, 1982-January 16, 1983. [Phoenix, Ariz.]: [Pueblo Grande Museum], 1982. Autry National Center, Arizona State Library, Archives & Public Records, Arizona State University Libraries, Fort Lewis College. Cocopa –Mohave –Yuma –Maricopa –Hualapai –Yavapai –Havasupai –Diegueño –Kamia

 

Lamb, Frank W. Indian Baskets of North America. Riverside, Calif: Riverside Museum Press, 1972. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. Aleut –Tlingit –Haida –Salish group (Interior, Coastal, Fraser River and Thompson River) –Nootka group (Nootka, Quinault, Makah and Quilleute) –Oregon basket makers –Wasco –Siletz –Nez Perce –Klamath group (Klamath and Modoc) –Hupa group (Hupa, Karok, Yurok, Wiyot and Tolowa) –Pomo –Shastan group (Pit River and Hat Creek) –Maidu –Yokut group (Tulare, Kern River, Tejon and Fresno) —Mission group (Diegueno, Luiseno, Capistrano, Cupeno, Gabrielano and Fernandeno) —Cahuilla –Chumash (Santa Barbara) –Chemehuevi –Washo (Tahoe, Carson) –Mono (Owens Valley Paiute) –Panamint (Death Valley) –Northern Paiute –Ute –Hualapai (Walapai) and Havasupai –Pima –Papago —
Apache (Western, San Carlos, Jicarillo and Mescalero) –Navajo –Hopi (Second Mesa and Third Mesa) –Pueblo –Seri –Chitimacha –Koasati (Coushatta) –Choctaw –Seminole –Cherokee –Algonquian –Micmac –Penobscot –Ojibwa –Chippewa –Iroquois –Mohawk –Eskimo (Eastern, Western).

 

Langdon, Margaret. A Grammar of Diegueño; The Mesa Grande Dialect. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1970. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside, California State University Fullerton.

 

Langdon, Margaret. 1975. “Kamia and Kumeyaay: A Linguistic Perspective”. The Journal of California Anthropology. 2, no. 1: 64-70. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

 

Langdon, Margaret, Abraham M. Halpern, Pamela Munro, Leanne Hinton, and Judith Joël. Margaret Langdon papers. 1957. UC Berkeley Libraries. Abstract: The Margaret Langdon papers contain correspondence; proposals and projects, primarily the Comparative Dictionary of Yuman Languages consisting of correspondence, contracts, evaluations, data entries, and drafts. Also included are Langdon’s conference and workshop presentations along with numerous articles published in professional journals. The bulk of the collection contains research materials of Langdon and other anthropologists, linguists, language consultants, and students. They include correspondence, papers, workshop handouts, grammar notes, transcriptions, student papers, language lessons, articles, and notes. The research concentrates mainly on Native American languages such as Cocopa, Diegueno, Karuk, Kumeyaay, Mohave, Paipai, Yavapai, Yuman; from the areas of Southern California, Baja California, the Southwest, and Northwest Mexico. Included are the research of James Crawford, Judy Crawford, Ted Couro, Leanne Hinton, Abraham Halpern, Judith Joel, and Pamela Munro. Many unpublished field notes and language slips/notes were moved by Langdon from the University of California, San Diego archive collections of Yuman languages to The Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley. There are some biographical information for Langdon and her class notebooks from the University of California at Berkeley, a few under the name of Margaret Hoffman. Langdon’s teaching materials include mainly courses in Linguistics and Anthropology at the University of California at San Diego from 1965-1991.

 

Langdon, Margaret. Yuman Texts. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976. University of California, Riverside, University of California Los Angeles, Arizona State University Libraries, Northern Arizona University. The tar baby story(Diegueno) — The rabbit and the coyote(Diegueno)/Roderick A. Jacobs — The story of eagle’s nest a Diegueno text/Margaret Langdon —

 

Leach, Maria. The Rainbow Book of American Folk Tales and Legends. Cleveland: World Pub. Co, 1958. San Diego State University Library, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, University of Southern California, Autry National Center. Ants (Diegueno: California) –

 

Lee, Melicent Humason, and Melicent Humason Lee. Indians of the Oaks. Ramona, Calif: Acoma Books, 1978. [Juvenile Fiction] San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Riverside.  Notes: Consists of 2 works, Indians of the oaks, originally published in 1931 under title: The Indians and I, and Secrets of the trail. Summary: In the first of these two tales a young white boy relates his experiences living with the Kumeyaay, also known as Diegueño, Indians of Southern California and in the second a young girl from the same tribe learns a new kind of medicine when she falls ill and is cared for by a white doctor.

 

Leeming, David Adams, and Margaret Adams Leeming. Encyclopedia of Creation Myths. Oxford: ABC-CLIO, 1996. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. A work devoted to creation myths from cultures throughout the world. With an A-Z format, this source provides quick access to information on the beliefs (both exotic and ordinary) of ancient civilizations from Sumeria and Babylonia to Egypt, Greece, and ancient Rome, from India and China to Japan and Indonesia, as well as the rich mythological history of Native Americans, the indigenous peoples of Australia, and many other cultures. We read of the creation myth of the Diegueno tribe of southern California in which the creator, Tu-chai-pai, made the earth female and the sky male and then formed mud into people; the Norse creation story of the gods Odin, Vili, and Ve, who made man and woman out of two fallen trees – Odin breathed life into the new pair, Vili’s gift to them was intelligence, and Ve gave the gifts of sight and hearing; and the myth of Japanese creation in which Izanagei, and his sister Izanami, watch the first land form from ocean water dripping from Izanagi’s spear. Alongside these ancient beliefs are the more modern, such as Darwin’s theory of evolution and the big bang theory. Each entry identifies the culture associated with the myth, and each myth is retold in prose, with extensive cross-referencing to guide readers to other entries. The authors share analyses of the relationship of certain myths across cultures, regions, and time.

 

Lehmann, Jeffrey. San Diego. [United States]: TravelVideoStore.com, 2006. [Video Recording] Boise Public Library, Washington County Cooperative Library Services, Arlington Heights Memorial Library, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Abstract: “Episode Highlights: Raise a sail on the tall ship Star of India, scuba dive with sea lions off the Coronado Islands, horseback ride on a historic California rancho, mountain bike through beaufitul Cleveland National Forest, hike Mission Trails Regional Park and learn about the native Kumeyaay Indians, visit the legendary and historic Cabrillo National Monument, go barnstorming in a real 1920’s bi-plane and learn about the most famous barnstormer of them all: Charles Lindbergh”—Container.

 

Levi, Jerome Meyer. Kenaach Kwahan: True Stories : a Discussion of Time and the Kumeyaay Cosmos. Harvard University. Department of Anthropology. Senior Honors Theses, 1981. Harvard University.

 

Lightfoot, Kent G., Otis Parrish, Lee M. Panich, Tsim D. Schneider, and K. Elizabeth Soluri. California Indians and Their Environment An Introduction. Berkeley; Los Angeles; London: University of California Press, 2009. Abstract: Capturing the vitality of California’s unique indigenous cultures, this major new introduction incorporates the extensive research of the past thirty years into an illuminating, comprehensive synthesis for a wide audience. Based in part on new archaeological findings, it tells how the California Indians lived in vibrant polities, each boasting a rich village life including chiefs, religious specialists, master craftspeople, dances, feasts, and ceremonies. Throughout, the book emphasizes how these diverse communities interacted with the state’s varied landscape, enhancing its already bountiful natural resources through various practices centered around prescribed burning. A handy reference section, illustrated with more than one hundred color photographs, describes the plants, animals, and minerals the California Indians used for food, basketry and cordage, medicine, and more. At a time when we are grappling with the problems of maintaining habitat diversity and sustainable economies, we find that these native peoples and their traditions have much to teach us about the future, as well as the past, of California.

 

López, Raúl A., and Christopher L. Moser. Rods, Bundles & Stitches: A Century of Southern California Indian Basketry. Riverside, California: Riverside Museum Press, 1981. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, Riverside, California State University Fullerton, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. Appendix I : A short autobiography of Justin F. Farmer and a brief description of Diegueño methods of basket weaving / Justin F. Farmer –

 

Lummis, Charles Fletcher, and Helen H. Roberts. [United States, California, Luiseño or Diegeño Indians?, ca. 1900-1920]. 1900. [Audio Recording]  Indiana University, Archives of Traditional Music. Notes: California Indian music. Aluminum disc, probably dubbed from cylinders by Helen H. Roberts; sound quality poor. “Lummis–Song for images of the dead”–Label.

 

Luomala, Katharine. 1963. “Flexibility in Sib Affiliation Among the Diegueno”. Ethnology. 2, no. 3: 282-301. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

 

Luna, James, Steven Lawrence, Nick Torrens, and Phil Lucas. Native tongues. [S.l.]: Yerosha Productions, 2003. [Video Recording] Institute of American Indian Arts Library, University of Colorado Denver, Downtown Campus, Saint Cloud State University, Florida International University. Summary: Two indigenous artists, Australian Aboriginal Ningali Lawford and Luiseño/Diegueño Native American James Luna, use an interactive video link to share dialogue, performances, and video diaries providing a thought provoking reminder of the vitality and importance of American Indian and Aboriginal cultures.

 

Margolin, Malcolm, and Yolanda Montijo. Native Ways: California Indian Stories and Memories. Berkeley, Calif: Heyday Books, 1995. [Juvenile Audience] San Diego State University Library, University of California, Riverside, University of Redlands, California State University Fullerton. A map included shows the location of the following native California peoples: Tolowa –Yurok –Chilula –Whilkut –Wiyot –Bear River –Mattole –Sinkyone –Wailaki –Kato –Karuk –Shasta –Modoc –Hupa –Achumawi –Chimiriko –Wintu –Nongatl –Atsugewi –Northern Paiute –Yana —
Maidu –Lassik –Nomlaki –Yuki –Konkow –Washo –Nisenan –Patwin –Pomo –Wappo –Lake Miwok –Coast Miwok –Miwok –Mono Paiute –Ohlone (Costanoan). Peoples continued: Northern Valley Yokuts –Southern Valley Yokuts –Salinan –Esselen –Owens Valley Paiute –Western Mono –Foothill Yokuts –Tubatulabal –Panamint Shoshone –Chemehuevi –Kawaisu –Kitanemuk –Chumash –Tatavium –Serrano –Tongva (Gabrielino) –Mohave –Ajachmen (Juaneno) –Luiseno –Cahuilla –Halchidhoma –Cupeno —Kumeyaay –Quechan (Yuma).

 

Martin, Steve L. 2009. “The Use of Marah Macrocarpus by the Prehistoric Indians of Coastal Southern California”. Journal of Ethnobiology. 29, no. 1: 77-93. University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Riverside, California State University Fullerton. Abstract: A review of the available data from macrobotanical analyses conducted on prehistoric archaeological sites found in coastal southern California indicates the ubiquitous nature of carbonized Marah macrocarpus (Greene) Greene (wild cucumber) seed coat fragments. Their recovery from cultural deposits in carbonized form indicates prehistoric use; however, all parts of the plant are toxic, and plants that typically function in medicinal or ritualistic roles are rarely recovered as part of the macrobotanical assemblage. In an attempt to shed some light on the possible prehistoric uses of wild cucumber by the native peoples of coastal southern California, this paper examines the current distribution of Marah , the archaeological occurrence of M. macrocarpus , as well as pertinent biochemical and morphological characteristics of the plant, particularly the seed. Finally, ethnobotanical accounts of the use of Marah by the native peoples of the Pacific west are discussed in light of current research on the physical properties and biological activities of various compounds found in Marah . This information is offered as a guide for future archaeological investigations of the possible uses of the taxon by the prehistoric Indians of coastal southern California and elsewhere.

 

Mayes, Arion T. 2010. “These Bones Are Read: The Science and Politics of Ancient Native America”. American Indian Quarterly. 34, no. 2: 131-156. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.  Abstract: At approximately 9,500 years old, two sets of human remains from La Jolla, California (W-12), known as the University House Burials due to the physical location of their discovery on property owned by the University of California, San Diego, are some of the oldest in the United States. These burials are central to a repatriation controversy between the University of California, San Diego, and the Kumeyaay Cultural Repatriation Committee, which represents 12 federally recognized Kumeyaay/Diegueno tribal governments in San Diego County, California. The story of the La Jolla burials is a politically complicated one involving the Kumeyaay Indian Tribe’s efforts to claim and repatriate the La Jolla remains, the University of California, San Diego’s property issues and scientific interests, the local community’s concerns, federal law, and the question of the population origins of the La Jolla remains. This final point has become central to determining who should ultimately have control over the final disposition of the burials, a point that has been, and will be, at the heart of many repatriation disputes. This article focuses on the science of determining the origins of all remains of great antiquity, including the La Jolla burials themselves.

 

McGowan, Charlotte. Ceremonial Fertility Sites in Southern California. San Diego, Calif: San Diego Museum of Man, 1982. University of California, Riverside, California State University Fullerton, California State University, Los Angeles, University of Southern California, University of California, Los Angeles.

 

McNamee, Gregory. The Bearskin Quiver: A Collection of Southwestern American Indian Folktales. Einsidedeln: Daimon Verlag, 2002. University of California Los Angeles, Arizona State University Libraries, Northern Arizona University, University of Arizona Libraries. The Beginning –Diegueno –

 

Meyer, Paula Lindell. Indigenous language loss and revitalization in Tecate, Baja California. Thesis (Ph. D.)–San Diego State University and Claremont Graduate University, 2006. San Diego State University Library, The Claremont Colleges, University of New Mexico-Main Campus, University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

 

Miller, Amy Whitmore. A Grammar of Jamul Diegueño. Thesis (Ph. D), University of California, San Diego, Department of Linguistics, 1990. University of California, San Diego, Rice University, University of Pittsburgh.

 

Miller, Amy. A Grammar of Jamul Tiipay / Amy Miller. Hawthorne, N.Y.: Mouton de Gruyter, 2001. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. This text is a descriptive grammar of the Jamul variety of Tiipay (also known as Jamul Diegueno), a Yuman language spoken in San Diego County, California.

 

Miller, Florian H., and James R. Moriarty. Astro II: A Pre-Spanish Diegueno Site in Poway, California. [San Diego?]: [San Diego Science Foundation?], 1962. University of California, San Diego,

 

Miller, Patricia Morrow. Aboriginal Use of Harper Flat.  Thesis (M.S.) San Diego State University 1975. San Diego State University Library.

 

Miskwish, Michael Connolly. Kumeyaay: A History Book. El Cajon, CA: Sycuan Press, 2007. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Riverside, University of California, Los Angeles. Abstract: This volume provides a concise history of the Kumeyaay people. The book takes the reader from the time prior to contact with Europeans, through the period of Spanish presidios, colonization, and missionization, into the period of Mexican colonization and the vast rancheros, finally culminating with the American period from 1848 to 1873. The Kumeyaay are Native American people whose traditional homelands extended from Escondido to the Laguna Mountains (San Diego County, CA) in the U.S., to Ensenada, and Tecate (Baja California) in Mexico. Contents: Vol. 1. Precontact to 1893. Precontact –The Spanish incursion: 1769-1822 –The Mexican period: 1822-1846 –The American entry: 1846-1893 –App. A. Kumeyaay lands map –B. Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo –C. Treaty of Santa Ysabel –D. An Act for the Relief of the Mission Indians in the state of California.

 

Miskwish, Michael Connolly, and Joel Zwink. Sycuan: Our People, Our Culture, Our History : Honoring the Past, Building the Future. [El Cajon, Calif.]: Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation, 2006. San Diego State University Library, University of California, Los Angeles, Arizona State University Libraries, California State Library, Humboldt State University, Southern Oregon University Library. Contents: Traditional Kumeyaay society –The Spanish & Mexican periods –Early American period –Sycuan : a legacy begins –Sycuan : the challenges –Sycuan : self-determination.

 

Morgan, Joelle. A Comparison of Kumeyaay Tool Materials: An Analysis of Use-Wear with Wood and Stone. Thesis (senior honors in Anthropology)–University of California, Berkeley, May  2008. UC Berkeley Libraries.

 

Moriarty, James Robert. Cosmogeny, Rituals, and Medical Practice Among the Diegueno Indians of Southern California. S.l: s.n.], 1965. Autry National Center. Reprinted from Anthropological Journal of Canada, vol. 3, no. 3.

 

Moriarty, James Robert. The Good Port of San Diego. Trident Publishers, 1968. Notes:  Reprinted from: Oceans Magazine, v. 1, no. 1, January 1968.

 

Musica tradicional Kumiai traditional Kumeyaay music. S.l: s.n.,], 1995. [Audio Recording] University of California, Riverside. Contents: Volume 1: Gloria Castaneda –volume 2: Celia Silva.

 

Nabokov, Peter. Native American Testimony: An Anthology of Indian and White Relations ; First Encounter to Dispossession. New York: Crowell, 1978. [Juvenile Audience] San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Riverside, California State University Fullerton. Summary: A collection of documents in which native Americans describe their responses to the explorers, traders, missionaries, settlers, and government diplomats and soldiers seeking dominion over their ancient homeland. Contents: Janitin is named Jesus / Janitin, Kamia –

 

Native American Perspectives. Evanston, Ill: Nextext, 2001. [Secondary (senior high) school] Burbank Public Library, University of California, Santa Barbara, College of Southern Nevada, Western New Mexico University, San Juan College Library, Northwest Nazarene University. Notes: “Nextext Historical readers introduce students to key events and issues in our history through the voices of people who experienced them firsthand. Fascinating source documents and illustrations are arranged in chronological and/or thematic units that establish context”–P. [4] of cover. Contents: Cruelty at the San Miguel mission (1820s) / by Janitin (Kamia).

 

Olsen, Nancy J. Native American Land Usage at Angelina Springs in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park Borrego Springs, California. Thesis (M.A.)–University of Idaho, 1993. University of Idaho Library.

 

Opel, Fritz, and Juande Ragsdale Blevins. Reflections Under the Pepper Tree. El Cajon, Calif: Sycuan Gaming Center, 1993. University of California, Riverside. Notes: “A compilation of historical and cultural recollections of the Sycuan Band of Mission Indians from tribal members, elders and other Kumeyaay story tellers”–Cover.

 

Parker, Clyde. Mahogany Hue. San Diego, Calif.?: s.n, 1960. Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens. Diegueño Indians — History — Poetry. Notes: Date from poem San Diego episodes, dating events 1000 A.D. to 1956; and from date of acquisition, June 1962.

 

Parkman, Edward Breck. Soapstone for the Cosmos: Archaeological Discoveries in the Cuyamaca Mountains. Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology. eScholarship, University of California, 1983. Abstract: The Cuyamaca Mountains of interior San Diego County are a remote region characterized by a vast diversity of natural and cultural resources. Located 60 km. east of San Diego, and within the ethnographic homeland of the Kumeyaay Indians, the Cuyamacas comprise a major portion of the Peninsular Range. The region is drained by the San Diego and Sweetwater rivers, and ranges in elevation from 1,000 to 2,000 m. above sea level. Local plant communities include well-developed chaparral, grassland meadow, and oak-pine woodland associations.

 

Perdue, Theda. Sifters Native American Women’s Lives. New York: Oxford Univ Press, 2001. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. Abstract: In this edited volume, Theda Perdue, a nationally known expert on Indian history and southern women’s history, offers a rich collection of biographical essays on Native American women. From Pocahontas, a Powhatan woman of the seventeenth century, to Ada Deer, the Menominee woman who headed the Bureau of Indian Affairs in the 1990s, the essays span four centuries. Each one recounts the experiences of women from vastly different cultural traditions–the hunting and gathering of Kumeyaay culture of Delfina Cuero, the pueblo society of San Ildefonso potter Maria Martinez, and the powerful matrilin. Contents: Contributors; Introduction; 1 Pocahontas: The Hostage Who Became Famous; 2 Mary Musgrove: Creating a New World; 3 Molly Brant: From Clan Mother to Loyalist Chief; 4 Sacagawea: The Making of a Myth; 5 Catharine Brown: Cherokee Convert to Christianity; 6 Lozen: An Apache Woman Warrior; 7 Mourning Dove: Gender and Cultural Mediation; 8 Gertrude Simmons Bonnin: For the Indian Cause; 9 Lucy Nicolar: The Artful Activism of a Penobscot Performer; 10 Maria Montoya Martinez: Crafting a Life, Transforming a Community; 11 Alice Lee Jemison: A Modern “Mother of the Nation.”

 

Phoebe Apperson Hearst Memorial Volume: On the Twentieth Anniversary of the Organization of the Department and Museum of Anthropology of the University of California, September 10, 1901. Berkeley, Calif: University of California Press, 1923. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside, Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens. Historical introduction.–Notes on the Tillamook, by F. Boas.–Papago nominal stems, by J. Dolores.–Notes on the southern Maidu, by P.-L. Faye.–Pomo doctors and poisoners, by L.S. Freeland.–Pomo lands on Clear Lake, by E.W. Gifford.–Habitat of the Wailaki, by P.E. God-Mound excavations near Stockton, by Philip Mills Jones.–The history of native culture in California, by A.L. Kroeber.–The cultural connection of Californian and plateau Shoshonean tribes, by Robert H. Lowie.–Patwin houses, by W.C. McKern.–The northern Paiute language of Oregon, by W.L. Marsden.–A preliminary sketch of the Yaqui language, by J. Alden Mason.–Plants used in basketry by the California Indians [with bibliography] by Ruth Earl Merrill.–Northern Paiute verbs, by Gilbert Natches.–Text analyses of three Yana dialects, by Edward Sapir.–Southern Diegueño customs, by Leslie Spier.–Notes on eight Papago songs, by E.G. Stricklen.–Yurok affixes, by T.T. Waterman.—Index

 

Pitt Rivers Museum, and Linda Mowat. Catalogue of the Native American Collections. [Oxford]: Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford, 1993. University of California, San Diego, Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens, University of California Los Angeles, University of California, Santa Barbara, University of Arizona Libraries. California. Achumawi ; Atsugewi ; Chumash ; Costanoan ; Diegueno ; Hupa ; Klamath ; Karok ; Maidu (Maidu : Konkow) ; “Mission” ; Miwok ; Modoc ; Patwin ; Pomo ; San Nicoleno ; Shasta ; Wappo ; Yokuts ; Yuki ; Yurok ; California unknown group –Great Basin. Bannock ; Chemehuevi ; Paiute ; Ute ; Washo ; Great Basin unknown group.

 

Poon, Elysia. Indigenous Remapping in the Southern Californian Landscape. 2012. University of New Mexico-Main Campus. Abstract: The history of Native people in Southern California is both unique in that, until the last few decades, many people within the state were completely unaware of the presence of living Native Californians. With the onset of the gaming industry in the late 1980s, however, the visibility of Native California skyrocketed. Beginning in the 1990s, homes and streets were filled with gaming ads, political campaigns touting the benefits of gaming and at times, entire tribal councils were making their presence known at public events. Additionally, the fight for many unrecognized tribes in California in conjunction with the rise in economic enterprises, and a long history of ignoring the presence of Native Californians, led many non-Native California residents to challenge the legitimacy of gaming and federal recognition. It is through this complex and highly charged climate that I examine contemporary Native landscape in Southern California. By looking at public spaces owned by California tribes, I study the impact of these spaces on the socio-political climate of today and the Southern California landscape. These spaces, with varying levels of interiority and exteriority (places meant for tribal members versus non-tribal) as well as financial capacities, came to fruition during the same period of increased visibility and helped change the ways these highly contested issues were viewed. I argue that, depending on the level of exteriority or interiority, the architecture and design will often take on a decidedly “Indian” look that ranges from being definitively California Native to Native American in general. I attempt to shed more light on the complex histories leading to the creation of some of the tribally owned institutions dotting the Southern California landscape today. These Native-owned spaces metaphorically and literally change the way the public views landscape and themselves.

 

Putnam, F. W., and A. L. Kroeber. University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology. Volume 8 (VIII) 1908-1910 Volume 8 (VIII) 1908-1910. New York: Kraus Reprint, 1964. Gettysburg College.  Contents: No. 1. A mission record of the California Indians from a manuscript in the Bancroft Library / A.L. Kroeber –no. 2. The ethnology of the Cahuilla Indians / A.L. Kroeber –no. 3. The religion of the Luiseño and Diegueño Indians of southern California / Constance Goddard DuBois –no. 4. The culture of the Luiseño Indians / Philip Stedman Sparkman –no. 5. Notes on Shoshonean dialects of southern California –n. 6. The religious practices of the Diegueño Indians / T.T. Waterman.

 

Rawls, James J., Alex Haley, and George Guzzi. Never Turn Back: Father Serra’s Mission. Austin, Tex: Raintree Steck-Vaughn, 1993. [Juvenile audience] San Diego State University Library, University of California, Riverside, Autry National Center, University of California, Santa Barbara. Describes the life of the Spanish priest who established missions in California in the late eighteenth century and discusses the lack of understanding between him and the Indians he came to convert.

 

Ritter, Eric W., Melissa Greer, and Peggy Whitehead. American Indian Rock Art. Volume 38 Volume 38. Glendale, Ariz: American Indian Rock Art Research Association, 2011. University of San Diego.  Contents: Location is everything : importance of landscape in a Kumeyaay rock art site / Gregory F. Erickson –

 

Rock Art Symposium, and Solveig A. Turpin. American Indian Rock Art: Proceedings of the International Rock Art Conference and 16th Annual Meeting of the American Rock Art Research Association. El Paso: El Paso Archaeological Society, 1990. San Juan College Library, US Bureau of Reclamation, Texas Tech University, St. Mary’s University. Contents: Repainting in Kumeyaay rock art: vandalism, defacement, or renewal? / Ken Hedges –

 

Russell, Jesse. Kumeyaay People. [S.l.]: Book On Demand Ltd, 2013.

 

Rust, Horatio N., Elias A. Bonine, C. J. Crandall, John C. H. Grabill, Nellie Rust Lockwood, and Edward H. Rust. Horatio N. Rust Photograph Collection: Album of Indians of Southern California and the Southwest. 1886. Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens. A photograph album compiled by Horatio Nelson Rust (1828-1906), U.S. Indian agent and archaeological artifact collector, documenting Indians living in Southern California, Arizona and New Mexico, approximately 1886-1905. Includes group portraits of Indian school students in California; members of the Cahuilla, Luiseno, Morongo, Mojave, Hopi, and Navajo tribes; the Indian Council at Pala, 1886; and scenes in Pechanga, Soboba and other native communities of Southern California. A smaller portion of the album includes Southwest and pueblo scenes; archaeological artifacts; and a few commercial photographs of North American Indians from elsewhere. Some notable images include: a snapshot of Chief Joseph and his nephew standing in front of a train, 1898; views of Navajo Indians whom Rust brought to Pasadena, San Pedro and the Pacific Ocean, 1902-03; and Indian agent Tom Jeffords. Rust appears in several photographs throughout the album. The photographs were made by various photographers, mostly unidentified, but some are credited: C. J. Crandall; E. A. Bonine; C. S. Fly (reproductions of photographs of Geronimo); and John Grabill. The album is accompanied by a four-page index by Rust and a few pieces of ephemera, including a printed card of “The Lord’s Prayer translated by William E. Connelley into the Wyandot language.”

 

Saunt, Claudio. 2010. “”My Medicine Is Punishment”: A Case of Torture in Early California, 1775-1776″. Ethnohistory. 57, no. 4: 679-708.

 

SCHAEFER, JERRY. 2000. “”Now Dead I Begin to Sing”: A Protohistoric Clothes-Burning Ceremonial Feature in the Colorado Desert”. Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology. 22, no. 2: 186-211. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. Abstract: The discovery of a well-preserved ceremonial feature at CA-IMP-6427 (the Elmore Site) provided the rare opportunity and special privilege to investigate the archaeological remains of a specific mortuary ritual, the Kumeyaay watlma or clothes-burning ceremony. Burned remains of a female’s bark skirt, yucca cordage carrying net, possible yucca sandal fragments, painted ceramic jar, hundreds of shell beads, and a shell pendant were found in a charcoal-filled pit within a Protohistoric Period temporary camp on the receding shoreline of Lake Cahuilla. That this feature could be identified with such certainty is due to several fortunate circumstances. The excellent preservation and spatial separation of the feature from the main occupation area made it possible to interpret it as the remains from a single event in time and space. The well-established late dates of the site and feature (A.D. 1600 to 1700) make an association with the Kumeyaay highly probable, although an affiliation with Delta Yumans is also considered below. Finally, the well-documented examples of Yuman mortuary ritual make an identification of the feature virtually certain. What makes the feature even more significant is the possibility to address aspects of gender and status among the prehistoric ancestors of the modern Kumeyaay, as well as the context of mortuary ceremonies within Late Prehistoric Period settlement systems.

 

Schaefer, Jerry, Lowell John Bean, and C. Michael Elling. Settlement and Subsistence at San Sebastian, a Desert Oasis on San Felipe Creek, Imperial County, California. San Diego, CA: Brian F. Mooney Associates, 1987.

 

Schultze, Carol A. A Reconstruction of Ystagua Village. Thesis (M.A.)–San Diego State University, 1992. San Diego State University Library.

 

Shackley, Michael Steven. Late Prehistoric Exchange Network Analysis in Carrizo Gorge and the Far Southwest. Thesis (M.A.) San Diego State University, 1981.  San Diego State University Library, Autry National Center.

 

Shackley, M. Steven, T. T. Waterman, Leslie Spier, and Edward Winslow Gifford. The Early Ethnography of the Kumeyaay. Berkeley: Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, 2004. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Riverside. edited by M. Steven Shackley ; introduction by M. Steven Shackley and Steven Lucas-Pfingst ; with reprints by Thomas T. Waterman, Leslie Spier, and Edward W. Gifford.

 

Shanks, Ralph C., and Lisa Woo Shanks. California Indian Baskets: San Diego to Santa Barbara and Beyond to the San Joaquin Valley, Mountains and Deserts. Novato, Calif: Costaño Books/University of Washington Press, 2010. University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, Palm Springs Public Library, University of California, Riverside. Abstract: Illustrated with rare baskets from museums and private collections around the world, this book honors the achievements of the First Californians and illuminates Native American art, history, technology, population movements, cultural interactions and native plant uses. Contents: Cahuilla, Cupeño, Juaneño, Kumeyaay, Luiseño and Serrano basketry –

 

Shapiro, Warren. 1966. “On Patrilocal Bands”. American Anthropologist. 68, no. 6: 1498-1502. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

Shipek, Florence. n.d. “Diegueno Pots”. Museo. 1, no. 2: 5-11.

 

Sherbert, Cedar, R. J. Lozada, Howard Duy Vu, Timo Chen, Sherman Alexie, and James Welch. Gesture down (I don’t sing). Los Angeles?, Calif: Cedar Sherbert], 2006. [Video Recording] University of Colorado at Boulder, University of Idaho Library. Abstract: The piece opens with Native singing and rattling and a panoramic shot of a Christian graveyard on the filmmaker’s home reservation in northeastern San Diego County, California . It is the site of his grandfather’s grave. His grandfather was a Kumeyaay singer, but Cedar Sherbert tells us, “I don’t sing. I never learned.” Sherbert seeks out the “last” Kumeyaay singer who apparently lives on the other side of the border in his grandfather’s village, the La Huerta Indian community in Baja California, Mexico. Notes: Inspired by the poem “Gesture down to Guatemala” by James Welch. One of seven short films commissioned by Sherman Alexie as part of a weekend-long tribute to Mr. Welch held at the Richard Hugo House in Seattle, Washington in 2004. Each artist visually interpreted a sample of Mr. Welch’s writing.

 

Sherbert, Cedar, Tantoo Cardinal, Raven Lockwood, and Norris-Guerrero Kimberly. Memory. S.l: s.n, 2002. [Video Recording]  Abstract: Kumeyaay filmmaker Cedar Sherbert explores the heartache of memory as an aunt mysteriously returns during preparations for the memorial of a young boy. A selection of the 2004 Sundance Film Festival’s Native Forum.

 

Sherman, Benjamin F., Mildred Voorhees, and David Henderson. Felicita Collection of Photographs and Ephemera. 1927. University of California, San Diego. Abstract: The Felicita collection of photographs and ephemera contains gelatin silver photographs and real photo postcards. The collection includes images of performers, performances, and the set (an outdoor amphitheater, now Felicita Park). Eleven images represent the performers and the set in 1927. A newspaper clipping includes an image of the local woman, Felicita, in old age.

 

Shinn, G. Hazen. Shoshonean Days; Recollections of a Residence of Five Years Among the Indians of Southern California, 1885-1889. Glendale, Calif: Priv. Print. for the author by the Arthur H. Clark Company, 1941. University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, La Sierra University, University of California, Riverside.

 

Shipek FE. 1981. “A Native American Adaptation to Drought: the Kumeyaay As Seen in the San Diego Mission Records, 1770-1798”. Ethnohistory (Columbus, Ohio). 28, no. 4: 295-312. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

 

Shipek, Florence C. Correction to “Kumeyaay Socio-Political Structure”. Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology. eScholarship, University of California, 1985.

 

Shipek, Florence C., and Delfina Cuero. Heritage San Diego. [San Diego]: San Diego Community College District in cooperation with KFMB-TV8, 1978. [Video Recording] Summary: Indian life during the Spanish Conquest as described by Delfina Cuero from her Autobiography and excerpts of which are narrated by Judy Johnson.

 

Shipek, Florence C. Kuuchamaa: The Kumeyaay Sacred Mountain. Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology. eScholarship, University of California, 1985. Abstract: While over the years I have been able to reconstruct a few portions of the Kumeyaay religious beliefs, the occasion for discussing my fragmentary reconstruction had not occurred. To discuss these matters under ordinary circumstances would be to cause someone’s death. Thus, passage of the National Environmental Policy Act and the Native American Religious Freedom Act, which provided the opportunity to protect the sacred mountain, Kuuchamaa, presented the opportunity to develop a more complete and correct understanding of the moralistic and mystical philosophy of the Kumeyaay religion. Further, the Kumeyaay elders, having become aware of the published descriptions of their society and their religion and desiring that more correct information be presented, have asked that this material be published.

 

Shipek, Florence C. Kumeyaay Socio-Political Structure. Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology. eScholarship, University of California, 1982. Abstract: The correlation of ethnographic with ethnohistoric and Mission Register data has clarified the analysis of Kumeyaay political structure by confirming the fact that the Kwaaypaay was not a “born” member of his band. He was not the head of the largest shiimull in a band, but was normally the only adult male of that sib in the band. This structure contrasts with that of the Cahuilla and the San Luiseno where the “Captains” were the heads of the largest lineages. The crosscutting of the shiimull organization by the territorial band organization increased the tribal or national level of Kumeyaay integration. Ethnohistoric data noting rapid communication of information between the Colorado River and the coast supports the ethnographic description of a nationally organized relay runner or courier system. This national organization of the shiimull/hands, with alliance leaders or Kuuchult kwataay, facilitated the shifting of population under erratic climatic conditions that were almost constantly affecting local resource availability. Furthermore, this complex structure integrated movement between ecological zones which required a variety of food-resource acquisition techniques. This included movement from the coast to the desert by way of foothills and mountains, and subsistence-related pursuits ranging from fishing to hunting, to desert riverine plant husbandry including irrigation farming (Shipek 1977, 1981, 1982, n.d.b).

 

Shipek, Florence Connolly. Viejas Band of Kumeyaay. Alpine, Calif.: Viejas Band, 2000.

 

Smith, Kalim H. Language Ideology and Hegemony in the Kumeyaay Nation: Returning the Linguistic Gaze. Thesis (M.A.)–University of California, San Diego,  2005.  University of California, San Diego.

 

Smith, Wayland H. “The Scattered Sheep of Mission Flocks”: An Account of the Present State of the Mission Indians in Southern California. [Los Angeles]: Los Angeles Council of the Sequoya League, 1907. University of California, San Diego, University of Southern California, University of California, Los Angeles.

 

Smythe, Charles W., and Priya Helweg. Summary of Ethnological Objects in the National Museum of Natural History Associated with the Tipai-Ipai Culture. Washington, D.C.: Repatriation Office, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, 1997. Smithsonian Institution Libraries.

 

Sparkman, Philip Stedman, A. L. Kroeber, T. T. Waterman, and Edward Sapir. Notes on California Folk-Lore. [Boston]: [publisher not identified], 1908. University of California, San Diego, UC Berkeley Libraries.  Contents: A Luiseño tale / by P.S. Sparkman –Wiyot folk-lore / by A.L. Kroeber –A southern California ceremony / by A.L. Kroeber –Diegueño identification of color with the cardinal points / by Thomas Waterman –Luck-stones among the Yana / by Edward Sapir.

 

Spier, Leslie. Leslie Spier Collection. 1918. Museum of Northern Arizona. This collection contains field notebooks, photographs and publications produced during Spier’s work with the Havasupai, Maricopa-Halchidoma, Southern Diegueno and Zuni tribes. Also, there are photographs from various other tribes, as well as maps.

 

Spier, Leslie. Southern Diegueño Customs. New York: Kraus Reprint, 1965. Arizona State University Libraries, San Diego Public Library, Occidental College Library.

 

STRONG, WILLIAM DUNCAN. 1927. “AN ANALYSIS OF SOUTHWESTERN SOCIETY1¹”. American Anthropologist. 29, no. 1: 1-61. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside. Notes: Dissertation offered in partial fullfilment for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, University of California, May, 1926.

 

Suarez, Darlene Mary. Gambling with Power: Race, Class, and Identity Politics on Indian Lands in Southern California. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of California, Riverside, 2003. San Diego State University Library, University of California, Riverside, California State Library.

 

Sycuan Gaming Center. Promotional and Publicity Material: Sycuan Gaming Center. 1990. University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries. Summary: Includes press releases, newspaper clippings, newsletters, and other types of promotional material.

 

Taylor, Chip, and George Emanuels. California Indian Series [Disc 3]. The Missions and 7 Southern Tribes [Disc 3]. The Missions and 7 Southern Tribes. Derry, NH: Chip Taylor Communications, 1999. [Video Recording] Summary: California’s missions are a lasting reminder of the days when the first Europeans pioneered this great land; also, they can remind us of the native people who lived here and whose way of life changed forever. In this program, author/historian George Emanuels addresses various aspects of mission life involving the native people; then, drawing from a vast collection of historical photos and drawings, the author/historian completes his thematic approach in illustrating differences between the natives by introducing viewers to seven southern California tribes: the Costanoan, Yokuts, Gabrieleno, Chumash, Luiseño, Diegueño and Cahuilla. To conclude the program, Mr. Emanuels offers a personal perspective on why he wrote the book, “California Indians: An Illustrated Guide.”

 

Thomas, David Hurst. 1976. “A Diegueño Shaman’s Wand: An Object Lesson Illustrating the “Heirloom Hypothesis”. The Journal of California Anthropology. 3, no. 1: 128-132. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

 

TOFFELMIER, GERTRUDE, and KATHARINE LUOMALA. 2006. “Dreams and Dream Interpretation of the Diegueño Indians of Southern California”. Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology. 26, no. 2: 215-228. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

 

Toucan Valley Publications (Firm). California Indians Fact Cards. Milpitas, CA: Toucan Valley Publications, 1996. San Diego Public Library, Orange County Public Libraries, Cerritos Library, Santa Fe Springs Library, County of Los Angeles Public Library. Achumawi — Athapaskans, Southern (Lassik, Mattole, Nongatl, Sinkyone, Wailaki) — Atsugewi — Cahto — Cahuilla — California Shoshone — Chemehuevi — Chilula — Chimariko — Chumash — Costanoan — Cupeno — Diegueno — Esselen — Gabrielino — Huchnom — Hupa — Karok — Kawaiisu — Kitanemuk — Konkow — Luiseno / Juaneno — Maidu — Miwok — Modoc — Mohave / Quechan — Monache — Nisenan — Nomlaki — Paiute — Patwin — Pomo — Salinan — Serrano — Shasta — Tataviam — Tolowa — Tubatulabal — Wappo — Washoe — Wilkut — wintu — Wiyot — Yana — Yokuts — Yuki — Yurok.

 

Treganza, Adan E. Possibilities of an Aboriginal Practice of Marginal Agriculture Among the Southern Diegueno. San Francisco: Society for California Archaeology, 1946. UC Berkeley Libraries, Harvard University.

 

Underhill, Ruth Murray. Indians of Southern California. [Washington, D.C.]: United States Department of Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Division of Education, 1941.  University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, California State University, Los Angeles, Autry National Center. Includes information about the history and culture of California’s Mission Indians such as the Chumash, Gabrieleño, Luiseño, Cupeño, Diegueño, Fernandeño, Cahuilla, Juaneño and Serrano.

 

United States, and Amiel Weeks Whipple. Report of the Secretary of War. Communicating in Answer to a Resolution of the Senate, the Report of Lieutenant Whipple’s Expedition from San Diego to the Colorado. February 1, 1851. Ordered to Be Printed. 1851. University of California, San Diego, Autry National Center, Arizona State Library, Archives & Public Records. Vocabulary of the Diegueño language, pp. 5-6; Vocabulary of the Yuman language, pp. 23-28.

 

University of California, Berkeley, and A. L. Kroeber. American Archaeology and Ethnology. New York: Kraus Reprint Corporation, 1965. Lassen Library District, University of Illinois at Chicago Library. Notes on the Tillamook.–Papago nominal stems.–Notes on the Southern Maidu.–Pomo doctors and poisoners.–Pomo lands of Clear Lake.–Habitat of the Wailaki.–Mound excavations near Stockton.–The history of native culture in California.–Cultural connectionn of Californian and plateau Shoshonean tribes.–Patwin houses.–Northern Paiute language of Oregon.–Preliminary sketch of the Yaqui language.–Plants used in basketry by the California Indians.–Northern Paiute verbs.–Text analyses of three Yana dialects.–Southern Diegueño customs.–Notes on eight Papago songs.–Yurok affixes.

 

Uribe, Stephanie Kay. Evaluation of Vegetation and Stream Restoration by the Kumeyaay Indians on the Campo Indian Reservation, San Diego County, California. Thesis (M.A.)–California State University, Long Beach, 1998, 1998. San Diego State University Library.

 

Van Camp, Gena R. Kumeyaay Pottery: Paddle-and-Anvil Techniques of Southern California. Socorro, N.M.: Ballena Press, 1979. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside.

Voxnova (Groupe musical), Isabelle Soccoja, Nicholas Isherwood, Pascal Dusapin, and Karlheinz Stockhausen. In the Sky I am Walking: Songs of the Native Americans. New York, N.Y.: Mode Records, 1998. [Audio Recording] Université de Montréal, Université de Sherbrooke – Service des bibliothèques et archives. Contents: Music of the Native Americans. Choctaw : processional (1:45) ; Omaha : invocation (0:36) ; Tsinshian (0:43) ; Diegueño (0:41) ; Tlingit (0:41) ; Navajo (0:55) ; Comanche (1:26) ; Comanche (0:47) ; Iriquois (1:19) –Red rock / Pascal Dusapin (6:30) –In the sky I am walking … (American Indian songs) / Karlheinz Stockhausen (42:34).

Wachi, Yasuko Amemiya. What Comes Next?: Native,  Americans of San Diego County : a Study of Uncertainty for an Ethnic Minority Group of Southern California. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of California, San Diego, 1994. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, UC Berkeley Libraries.

 

Wade, Sue Anne. Kumeyaay and Paipai Pottery As Evidence of Cultural Adaptation and Persistence in Alta and Baja California. Thesis (M.A.)–San Diego State University, 2004.  San Diego State University Library.

 

Waterman, T. T. The Religious Practices of the Diegueño Indians. Berkeley: The University Press, 1910. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Riverside.

 

Wescott, David. Primitive Technology II: Ancestral Skills. Salt Lake City: Gibbs Smith Publisher, 2001. Grand Canyon National Park Research Library, UC Berkeley Libraries. Diegueno Rawhide Sandals / by Paul Campbell –

 

White, Phillip M. Bibliography of Native American Bibliographies. Westport, Conn: Praeger, 2004. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside, California State University Fullerton.

 

White, Phillip M., and Stephen D. Fitt. Bibliography of the Indians of San Diego County: The Kumeyaay, Diegueño, Luiseño, and Cupeño. Lanham, Md: Scarecrow Press, 1998. San Diego State University Library, University of San Diego, University of California, San Diego, California State University San Marcos Library, University of California, Riverside.

 

Wilken, Michael Alan. An Ethnobotany of Baja California’s Kumeyaay Indians. Thesis (M.A.) San Diego State University, San Diego, Calif: 2012. San Diego State University Library. Abstract: The Kumeyaay Indians (also ‘Iipay–Tiipay, Ipai–Tipai, or Diegueño in the United States, or Kumiai in Mexico) have inhabited the landscapes of northern Baja California, Mexico, and southern California since long before European contact, originally making a living as mobile hunting, gathering, and fishing peoples in the region’s varied environments. The division of Kumeyaay territory in 1848 by two distinct nation states imposed on the region an international boundary as well as separate political and economic structures, cultures, and languages. Historical processes have reduced Kumeyaay territory and population, and transformed indigenous lifeways, yet a few elder Kumeyaay still speak their native language and maintain cultural knowledge of the environment. In this thesis, I explore the questions of how contemporary ethnobotanical knowledge of Baja California’s Kumeyaay Indians can make new contributions to scientific research of diachronic human-plant interactions in the study area, and how this knowledge can inform Kumeyaay cultural and linguistic revitalization through its incorporation in interpretive exhibits. I synthesize information from interviews conducted with 16 Kumeyaay plant specialists, documenting Kumeyaay knowledge of traditional uses for 47 native plants as food, medicine, tools, construction materials, and ritual resources, covering indigenous nomenclature, plant scheduling, harvesting, processing, and consumption, as well as cultural meanings associated with plants. I review archaeological, historical, ethnographic, linguistic, and botanical literature to situate the Kumeyaay ethnobotanical data in a regional and diachronic context. I discuss how this study contributes new information on the Kumeyaay and their interactions with the vegetative environment, and provide examples of how I have applied this information to support efforts toward Kumeyaay cultural and linguistic revitalization.

Williamson, Ray A. Archaeoastronomy in the Americas. Los Altos, Calif: Ballena Press, 1981. San Diego State University Library, University of California, San Diego, University of California, Irvine, University of California, Riverside, California State University Fullerton, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. Contents: Winter solstice observatory sites in Kumeyaay territory, San Diego County, California / Ken Hedges –

 

Wilson, Benjamin Davis, Edward Fitzgerald Beale, and Hubert Howe Bancroft. The Indians of Southern California: Los Angeles, Calif. 1852. UC Berkeley Libraries. Copy of letter and report, Dec. 20, 1852, to Edward F. Beale, U.S. Superintendent of Indian Affairs. In the handwriting of Benjamin Ignatius Hayes. Deals with conditions and prospects of the Mohave, Yuma, Tulareño, Cahuilla, Luiseño and Diegueño tribes. Published in the Los Angeles Star beginning Aug. 1, 1868.

Wilson, Marjorie Lloyd. Legends of the Diegueño Indians. Thesis (M.A.) San Diego State College, 1956. San Diego State University Library.

Winterhouse, John. The Historical Geography of San Diego: Some Aspects of Landscape Change Prior to 1850. Thesis (M.A.) San Diego State College 1972. San Diego State University Library.

Woodward, John A. 1968. “The Anniversary: A Contemporary Diegueno Complex”. Ethnology. 7: 86-94. IDS Basel Bern (IDSBB).

Zentella, Ana Celia. Multilingual San Diego: Portraits of Language Loss and Revitalization. San Diego, CA: University Readers, 2009. University of California, San Diego, California State University, Northridge, University of Nebraska – Lincoln. Contents: The contemporary Kumeyaay warrior : language and indigenous cultural survival in San Diego / Maxx Phillips –

Zepeda, Irma Carmen. Exchange Networks, Beads, and Social Status Among the Historic Kumeyaay. Thesis (M.A.)–San Diego State University, 1999. San Diego State University Library.